Lions, Babies, and Beauty

Matt Walsh chimed in on the eruption of outrage concerning the photo that went viral of Kendall Jones, a young beautiful Texas cheerleader, holding up the head of a lion in Africa that she killed. Overall I agree with him, but I think there is a deeper point that he is missing, and I think it is the answer to the seeming contradiction of how one can  happily and vehemently support a woman’s so-called-right to butcher the child in her womb (including recording it and posting  the video on the internet) but be utterly outraged and devastated by a young woman  killing a lion and posting a picture of it. The answer is beauty. We all have an inherent desire for beauty. We are born with it and we cannot escape it. Those who attack what is beautiful will inevitably hold to other forms and things of beauty to compensate for the beauty they destroy. The more they destroy, the greater the destruction the more skewed and unhealthy their attachment  to something else becomes. This applies equally to the “suicidal nihilists” and the “pro-life zealots” to which Mr. Walsh reduces us.

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3 Comments

  1. “how one can happily and vehemently support a woman’s so-called-right to butcher the child in her womb (including recording it and posting the video on the internet) but be utterly outraged and devastated by a young woman killing a lion and posting a picture of it.”

    If you want ask that, you should answer first: How can one be outraged at the elimination of a one cell fertilized egg with no neurons and yet eat factory farmed eggs, beef, milk and pork that are produced by the torture of conscious, feeling animals?

    1. EOTU, thanks for commenting. The only thing more rare than a post around here is a comment. I’m not asking the question. It comes from the post by Matt Walsh that I link to. My aim in this was to posit an answer to that question. Those who are outraged by the horror of abortion should also be deeply disturbed by the twistedness of torturing an animal. I think my proposed answer applies in both cases.

      On another note, I identify the question above not as a contradiction, but as a “seeming contradiction.” Matt Walsh presents it as a contradiction. I was trying here to show that what appears to be a contradiction is not necessarily so. In other words, one is not necessarily contradicting their self by applauding abortion and denouncing hunting.

      1. I wonder then, if the desire for beauty is in fact innate, if the action is compensatory or just a reflection of different standards of beauty?

        I agree that it is not necessarily a contradiction. People contradict themselves far less often than outside observers believe they do – perhaps the desire for consistency and order in though related to the drive for beauty. People’s internal ideas may often be vague and sloppy, but rarely are they blatantly contradictory.

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